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08

Jun

The Trust Differentiator
For ASTD, the world’s largest professional association dedicated to the training and development field, Stephanie Castellano writes here about the importance of trust in creating a productive workplace. Cited here is the Burson-Marsteller/Great Place to Work Survey on Return on Investment on workplace culture.
Jose Tolovi Jr., CEO of the Great Place to Work Institute, says: “Our research and experience has told us that buy-in from senior leadership is a crucial first step to improving a work environment. True company culture is a reflection of an entire organization—from the top down—and connecting company culture to business results requires a strategic and proactive decision on the part of management to become an environment of trust.”

The Trust Differentiator

For ASTD, the world’s largest professional association dedicated to the training and development field, Stephanie Castellano writes here about the importance of trust in creating a productive workplace. Cited here is the Burson-Marsteller/Great Place to Work Survey on Return on Investment on workplace culture.

Jose Tolovi Jr., CEO of the Great Place to Work Institute, says: “Our research and experience has told us that buy-in from senior leadership is a crucial first step to improving a work environment. True company culture is a reflection of an entire organization—from the top down—and connecting company culture to business results requires a strategic and proactive decision on the part of management to become an environment of trust.”

06

Jun

On the 68th anniversary of D-Day, author Geoff Loftus offers CEOs leadership tips from the D-Day CEO, Dwight Eisenhower.

16

Jan

2012 Consumer Electronics Show (Las Vegas, January 10-13)

No way to sum up the experience of attending my first CES other than to say, “It’s a good time to be alive.”

After reviewing many “Best of CES 2012” videos to share on this blog, I realized that a central, singular list is impossible. Technology is too personal. How it interests you and what it can do for you varies for each of us.

The most important thing that I learned is that CES is much more than a gadget show. It’s about health, education, safety, and democratization of technology through access to the masses.

Of course, I came away with a shopping list of gadgets “coming soon.” But, more importantly, I came away with excitement about how technology is helping us to lead better lives.

19

Dec

Corporations Focus on Career Developent by PRWeek
The study that Burson-Marsteller conducted with the Great Place to Work Institute garnered substantial interest in the media and the blogosphere. Here’s is an exerpt from last week’s article by PRWeek. (Full article in the link above).
The infographic was developed by Burson-Marsteller to call out more detail and key findings.
PRWeek — NEW YORK (December 15, 2011): Multinational companies are evolving their employee programs to focus more on career development and brand mission versus on-site perks such as food and childcare, according to a study conducted by the Great Place to Work Institute and Burson-Marsteller.
Three-quarters of respondents (75%) said both brand mission and career development programs had the most significant impact on ROI, followed by benefits such as flextime, health insurance, and maternity and paternity leave at 15%. Five percent of employees cited onsite perks and volunteer opportunities.
“It was surprising to see how low traditional benefits, such as childcare and volunteer opportunities, ranked in terms of being drivers of workplace culture,” said Deidre Campbell, MD at Burson-Marsteller. “Benefits that had been popular less than 10 years ago are seen today as table stakes among the best places to work in the world. Cutting-edge companies are focusing well beyond the trendy, nice-to-have benefits to offer what globally competitive talent really wants — career development and growth opportunities. Ultimately, these are the benefits that lead most directly to return-on-investment in the people.”
The study, which took place in October, followed the release of Great Places to Work’s “World’s Best Multinational Workplaces” report. That study examined the relationship between positive workplace environment and financial performance, said Campbell.

Corporations Focus on Career Developent by PRWeek

The study that Burson-Marsteller conducted with the Great Place to Work Institute garnered substantial interest in the media and the blogosphere. Here’s is an exerpt from last week’s article by PRWeek. (Full article in the link above).

The infographic was developed by Burson-Marsteller to call out more detail and key findings.

PRWeek — NEW YORK (December 15, 2011): Multinational companies are evolving their employee programs to focus more on career development and brand mission versus on-site perks such as food and childcare, according to a study conducted by the Great Place to Work Institute and Burson-Marsteller.

Three-quarters of respondents (75%) said both brand mission and career development programs had the most significant impact on ROI, followed by benefits such as flextime, health insurance, and maternity and paternity leave at 15%. Five percent of employees cited onsite perks and volunteer opportunities.

“It was surprising to see how low traditional benefits, such as childcare and volunteer opportunities, ranked in terms of being drivers of workplace culture,” said Deidre Campbell, MD at Burson-Marsteller. “Benefits that had been popular less than 10 years ago are seen today as table stakes among the best places to work in the world. Cutting-edge companies are focusing well beyond the trendy, nice-to-have benefits to offer what globally competitive talent really wants — career development and growth opportunities. Ultimately, these are the benefits that lead most directly to return-on-investment in the people.”

The study, which took place in October, followed the release of Great Places to Work’s “World’s Best Multinational Workplaces” report. That study examined the relationship between positive workplace environment and financial performance, said Campbell.

16

Dec

Leaders from the World’s Best Companies on the ROI of Culture
In late October, the Great Place to Work Institute (GPTW) announced its first ever Greatest Multinational Companies to Work For list. We had the pleasure of partnering with GPTW on the launch effort. In doing so, we couldn’t resist the urge to ask the leadership of the 25 best places to work in the world how they view the return-on-investment of having a great culture. We surveyed them specifically on what kind of benefits matter today and what is driving them.
Above all, the globalization of competitiveness for talent requires that leading corporations develop their people as they grow their business. In an article for the Harvard Business Review, I expounded on the findings and what they mean for employers and employees alike.

Leaders from the World’s Best Companies on the ROI of Culture

In late October, the Great Place to Work Institute (GPTW) announced its first ever Greatest Multinational Companies to Work For list. We had the pleasure of partnering with GPTW on the launch effort. In doing so, we couldn’t resist the urge to ask the leadership of the 25 best places to work in the world how they view the return-on-investment of having a great culture. We surveyed them specifically on what kind of benefits matter today and what is driving them.

Above all, the globalization of competitiveness for talent requires that leading corporations develop their people as they grow their business. In an article for the Harvard Business Review, I expounded on the findings and what they mean for employers and employees alike.

13

Oct

Occupy Wall Street: An Opportunity for Corporate Leadership
By: Deidre H. Campbell
Wall Street protestors cannot be dismissed as a mob in the streets. It’s a massive, growing demonstration of frustration. And, unfortunately, a lot of people in this country have good reason to be angry. They didn’t cause the economic crisis. But it’s sure impacting their ability to get jobs.
While Occupy Wall Street takes to the streets in 250 cities around the world, the financial services industry and Washington seemingly take no action. Even more frustrating is that the dialogue on Occupy Wall Street undermines its efforts as lacking messages and focus without making the larger connection.
The point is that it’s happening at all.
The energy of Occupy Wall Street is being wasted on inarticulate outrage, because it’s leaderless. The protesters, along with many in the general public, are crying out for someone to help them understand why the debt-ceiling problem remains unsolved, when the job market will recover, and where symbols of hope can be found.
We do have some great leaders in financial services that could credibly take action, grab the leadership mantle and provide solutions. Treat the entire situation like a sustained crisis, and the classic communication steps come into play – (1) apologize, (2) address the problem, and (3) make sure it doesn’t happen again.
·       Apologies can be tricky. A mere acknowledgment would go a long way in assuaging the wounded. These people are, after all, customers and hopefully future customers. They need to know that financial services institutions are committed to bringing their respective companies and especially their customers though this difficult period. Think Obama March 2008, bravely taking the race issue on front and center and then putting it behind everyone in the campaign. Look the issues dead in the eye and then move forward.
·       Addressing the problem will be far more complicated. While Occupy Wall Street has now expanded to mean “mad about everything”, the initial movement was able to cast a net around why this movement and why now. Too many student loans. No jobs to pay them back. Taking these two concerns as the premise of the movement, we can begin to address them through education and action.
·       Macro-economic Schooling: Consider that Occupy Wall Street is a microcosm of society. It is pretty clear that the demonstrators do not understand the global financial dynamics that are causing the drag on recovery. This is clear in their accusations heralded at the vaguely defined “Wall Street.” A financial education program that was honest, direct and delivered with straightforward language would be appreciated by everyone – far beyond the protestors. With greater understanding of domestic and global economic conditions, individuals can make better judgments for gauging progress and assessing the role of government and private sector in the progress.
·       Take on the Jobs Issue: Financial services companies take on a myriad of needs through their corporate responsibility program and foundation work. Why not take on the jobs issue first hand? Howard Schultz of Starbucks (NASDAQ: SBUX) has been the first to take a step in that direction with its “Jobs for USA” program. Not that Starbucks can cure job market woes with a $5 million donation and themed bracelets for sale, but it’s interesting to see business take action with tangible steps toward solutions. Even while unemployment stays stubbornly at 9.2%, thousands of jobs – largely tech-based – remain unfilled based on the lack of individuals with the right skills. Financial services companies could fund jobs retraining programs for individuals with the right backgrounds to traverse the skills gap. By showing that they are taking the job issue on directly, companies could demonstrate their recognition of the problem and their determination to be part of the solution.
·        Making sure it doesn’t happen again is the final and often the most important step in moving through a crisis. The steps taken in this phase need to be real and long-lasting. Guided by the initial focus of Occupy Wall Street, it is the intersection of joblessness and debt that are causing widespread anxiety. For students, the feeling is that they were duped by “Wall Street” by making the debt so easily available to them for expensive educations only to rob them of jobs through market greed and short-sightedness. Making sure it doesn’t happen again requires education and remediation.  
·       Financial Education: Just like every other type debt, student aid was easy to get and enthusiastically encouraged. Certainly, no one foresaw this long lasting economic downturn, but the lax lending practices were at the heart of the crisis broadly. University-based financial education should be the center piece of financial services companies presence on-campus and online for this demographic. Companies are already there recruiting. If they are seen as a solid corporate citizens, those recruiting goals would be even easier. 
·       Take a Stand on Regulatory Reform: The general consensus is that financial services companies are pushing back on government efforts for regulatory reform. Frustration is felt because of the endless debate that doesn’t seem to result in any concrete reform efforts. This is where the lack of leadership is felt most harshly. With Washington firmly planted in presidential election mode, the opportunity is rich for financial services companies – even collectively – to propose regulations that  safeguard long-term financial security for all. The public (not just Occupy Wall Street) needs to know this situation won’t happen again.  
Without leadership and understanding, it’s not surprising that frustration is coming to a head – and not just in the United States. Remember, every protester is joined by thousands more equally frustrated and likely to take this angst out in other ways, like a lack of customer loyalty. Tackling the issues isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s good for the bottom line.
(Image: Wikipedia)

Occupy Wall Street: An Opportunity for Corporate Leadership

By: Deidre H. Campbell

Wall Street protestors cannot be dismissed as a mob in the streets. It’s a massive, growing demonstration of frustration. And, unfortunately, a lot of people in this country have good reason to be angry. They didn’t cause the economic crisis. But it’s sure impacting their ability to get jobs.

While Occupy Wall Street takes to the streets in 250 cities around the world, the financial services industry and Washington seemingly take no action. Even more frustrating is that the dialogue on Occupy Wall Street undermines its efforts as lacking messages and focus without making the larger connection.

The point is that it’s happening at all.

The energy of Occupy Wall Street is being wasted on inarticulate outrage, because it’s leaderless. The protesters, along with many in the general public, are crying out for someone to help them understand why the debt-ceiling problem remains unsolved, when the job market will recover, and where symbols of hope can be found.

We do have some great leaders in financial services that could credibly take action, grab the leadership mantle and provide solutions. Treat the entire situation like a sustained crisis, and the classic communication steps come into play – (1) apologize, (2) address the problem, and (3) make sure it doesn’t happen again.

·       Apologies can be tricky. A mere acknowledgment would go a long way in assuaging the wounded. These people are, after all, customers and hopefully future customers. They need to know that financial services institutions are committed to bringing their respective companies and especially their customers though this difficult period. Think Obama March 2008, bravely taking the race issue on front and center and then putting it behind everyone in the campaign. Look the issues dead in the eye and then move forward.

·       Addressing the problem will be far more complicated. While Occupy Wall Street has now expanded to mean “mad about everything”, the initial movement was able to cast a net around why this movement and why now. Too many student loans. No jobs to pay them back. Taking these two concerns as the premise of the movement, we can begin to address them through education and action.

·       Macro-economic Schooling: Consider that Occupy Wall Street is a microcosm of society. It is pretty clear that the demonstrators do not understand the global financial dynamics that are causing the drag on recovery. This is clear in their accusations heralded at the vaguely defined “Wall Street.” A financial education program that was honest, direct and delivered with straightforward language would be appreciated by everyone – far beyond the protestors. With greater understanding of domestic and global economic conditions, individuals can make better judgments for gauging progress and assessing the role of government and private sector in the progress.

·       Take on the Jobs Issue: Financial services companies take on a myriad of needs through their corporate responsibility program and foundation work. Why not take on the jobs issue first hand? Howard Schultz of Starbucks (NASDAQ: SBUX) has been the first to take a step in that direction with its “Jobs for USA” program. Not that Starbucks can cure job market woes with a $5 million donation and themed bracelets for sale, but it’s interesting to see business take action with tangible steps toward solutions. Even while unemployment stays stubbornly at 9.2%, thousands of jobs – largely tech-based – remain unfilled based on the lack of individuals with the right skills. Financial services companies could fund jobs retraining programs for individuals with the right backgrounds to traverse the skills gap. By showing that they are taking the job issue on directly, companies could demonstrate their recognition of the problem and their determination to be part of the solution.

·        Making sure it doesn’t happen again is the final and often the most important step in moving through a crisis. The steps taken in this phase need to be real and long-lasting. Guided by the initial focus of Occupy Wall Street, it is the intersection of joblessness and debt that are causing widespread anxiety. For students, the feeling is that they were duped by “Wall Street” by making the debt so easily available to them for expensive educations only to rob them of jobs through market greed and short-sightedness. Making sure it doesn’t happen again requires education and remediation. 

·       Financial Education: Just like every other type debt, student aid was easy to get and enthusiastically encouraged. Certainly, no one foresaw this long lasting economic downturn, but the lax lending practices were at the heart of the crisis broadly. University-based financial education should be the center piece of financial services companies presence on-campus and online for this demographic. Companies are already there recruiting. If they are seen as a solid corporate citizens, those recruiting goals would be even easier.

·       Take a Stand on Regulatory Reform: The general consensus is that financial services companies are pushing back on government efforts for regulatory reform. Frustration is felt because of the endless debate that doesn’t seem to result in any concrete reform efforts. This is where the lack of leadership is felt most harshly. With Washington firmly planted in presidential election mode, the opportunity is rich for financial services companies – even collectively – to propose regulations that  safeguard long-term financial security for all. The public (not just Occupy Wall Street) needs to know this situation won’t happen again. 

Without leadership and understanding, it’s not surprising that frustration is coming to a head – and not just in the United States. Remember, every protester is joined by thousands more equally frustrated and likely to take this angst out in other ways, like a lack of customer loyalty. Tackling the issues isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s good for the bottom line.

(Image: Wikipedia)

22

Sep

CGI Wraps Up to Record Success

More than $6B has helped 100M people around the world in education, IT, health, CO2 emission and microfinance.

At this 7th Annual Clinton Global Initiative, half of the attendees were from the business community, one third were from NGOs and the balance were world leaders – 55 in total. These included President Obama, Desmond Tutu, President Calderón of Mexico, and President Jacob Zuma of South Africa, to name a few.

In CGI’s first year, only 5% percent of the commitments for social good were partnerships. Most companies chose to fund and operate individually. At this year’s CGI, 25% were partner commitments that had been borne and fostered through the CGI network.

As stated by President Clinton, “When you put people first and politics second, you can get things like this done.”

20

Aug

Shut Up, Stop Whining & Get  a Life: 17 Kick-Butt Approaches to a Better Life
From the Business Insider’s War Room: Great, quick, funny — but very smart — advice for getting the most out of your life.
Do yourself a favor and take a look. It’s worth it and a good site to follow, as well.
Image: Google Images

Shut Up, Stop Whining & Get  a Life: 17 Kick-Butt Approaches to a Better Life

From the Business Insider’s War Room: Great, quick, funny — but very smart — advice for getting the most out of your life.

Do yourself a favor and take a look. It’s worth it and a good site to follow, as well.

Image: Google Images

18

Aug

Corporate Social Media in the C-Suite: Part II

Here’s the second part of my interview with Debra Flanz, founder and president of Business Clarity.

debraflanz:

Deidre Campbell, Managing Director in the corporate practice at Burson-Marsteller, is devoted to helping C-suite executives shape and articulate their vision through traditional and digital channels.

DF: For companies that have yet to engage in social media, where do they begin?

DC: To…